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​​ Tim is an Urban Fantasy and Science-Fiction Author who has one of the premier blogs on the internet. If you are a fan of Urban Fantasy and Sci-fi then I don't see how you couldn't find yourself becoming of fan of what Tim and his wife have planned and are doing. Most of it starts right there on his website and blogs. ​​

If you are just a reader looking for more than just a book recommendation, then Timothy Bateson's blog is going to give a look at an author like you have never had before and give you some great insight into the book being highlighted.

 If you are an author and have not been featured with Tim, do yourself a favor and sign up. He has an incredible layout. He works just as hard for you as he does for himself. Even admitting on occassion to me personally that sometimes he works harder promoting others' works than his own.
 
He has it down to a science and yet always is evolving to make it better. Make no mistakes, Tim has a talent for this. It's not just a posting waystation that he runs. This is a pivotal spot in anyone's marketing plans and/or reading habits. 

 So here is a little Q & A with the one and only, the awesome Timothy Bateson.


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  1. How long have you been blogging?
    Ramblings of an Author has been running since March 2014, so almost three-and-a-half years. My routine was very erratic, at first, because I had only a very basic idea of what blogging entailed, and almost no ideas what I wanted to feature. It took a few months to figure out my themes and posting schedule, and in 2015 I started featuring guest posts for fellow authors.
  2. If you were to step back look at your blog from a reader perspective, what do you think you would gravitate toward first, what information would you find exciting?
    My blog's homepage always features my most recent posts, but I find that it’s the book and author spotlights that tend to grab my attention. I think part of the reason they grab my attention is the images that appear in them.The book spotlights always open with a huge poster which basically encapsulates the information in the rest of the post. Scrolling down leads to a lot more information about the book, the author, and where you can find both. As a reader, I actually love reading about the authors behind the stories, and that’s when I start looking for author interviews.
  3. What do you think is a common mistake you see all to often in the promotions you receive?
    When I first started running guest posts, I approached the authors themselves offering guest slots. This allowed me to get all the information and images I needed. At this point, the biggest problem I had was not getting replies fast enough to check all the details and formatting before the post went live. Since then I have automated part of the process, and now the posts format themselves, and lead times can still be problematic. And now that authors can apply for a slot, I’ve had to turn down applications from authors whose books didn’t fit the genres I usually feature. So, with that in mind, I’d say there are two common mistakes: 1) Not allowing enough lead time between sending the blogger your information, and the desire live date for the post 2) Not checking the bloggers site and posting history, to establish if what you’re sending over is appropriate to their audience.
  4. How often are you surprised when you read someone’s answers?
    Everytime. That might sound like a flippant answer, but it’s actually the truth. I’m always surprised by at least one answer in each of the author spotlights I receive. Even when I think I know the author reasonably well, from Facebook groups, video chats, or discussions, I find out something interesting, or downright amazing. -I’ve discovered authors who share interests, which we’d never even talked about before. -Found out that we have similar reading lists, or preferred authors -Even learned things that I was able to come back to later for my own research
  5. Is there something in what they give you that the author or PA can do to make it stand out that isn’t already written down somewhere?
    When I get the writer’s biography, or responses to questions, I’d love to see things that most people wouldn’t suspect. So many writers have similar details in their bios, but how many can you name who love climbing mountains, have flown solo across the country, sit outside on a rainy day just because they can? It’s these kinds of personal details that I find that as a reader I’ll remember. They also make great talking points, and opportunities to reach new audiences who share those interests.
  6. What’s one tip you can offer someone who wants to do what you do with their blog?
    Decide what you want to do as early as possible, even before you start blogging, if you can. By picking your themes you’ll be able come up with posts easier, and maintain a consistent posting schedule. It’s consistency that will keep readers coming back to the blog, if you’re creating the kinds of posts that they want to read. Without that consistency, people will read couple of posts, and then start drifting away when they don’t see the next one. Your themes will also help you write headlines that attract people’s attention in the first place.
  7. How much of the SEO work have you done manually and how important do you think that is for a blog’s success?
    I have to be honest, SEO is something that I don’t work on as much as I should. I know that reaching the first page on search sites really helps boost views, and helps potential readers find the blog. However, my available SEO options are very limited on the platform my blog is on at the moment.
  8. What’s one question Author’s should ask themselves before promoting?
    Who is my ideal reader? Being able to narrow down your ideal readers will help you target your promotions to the people you are really trying to reach. There’s no point featuring horror imagery in your blurbs, or graphics, if your ideal reader wouldn’t be looking in the horror genre for your work. The more focused your picture of what constitutes your ideal reader, the more focused your promotion efforts can be.
  9. When looking at your own analytics for your blog what jumps out at you most often?
    Wednesday is the day I get the most views on my blog, but it’s not the Wednesday posts that get the most views. I also schedule my posts to go out in the early morning, but it’s mid afternoon that seems to see the most views. I’ve considered moving the posting times to later in the day, but some of the guest slots are time sensitive, and I want to give my fellow authors as much time in the spotlight as possible.
  10. When you are promoting your own books what do you look for in the blogs you choose to promote on?
    When I’m selecting blogs to approach for my own releases, I’m very careful to make sure that they feature the kind of stories that I’m looking to promote. If I can get an idea of how many followers that blog has, so much the better. But at the end of the day, I’d rather pitch a blog that consistently promotes urban fantasy (or science fiction) stories, but has a small following over a blog that promotes anything and has a large following. The more focused the blog is in terms of what they promote, the more likely there will be a community ready to give my stories a chance.
  11. (Without naming names) Have there been blogs that you have just steered away purposely and what commonality do you think those share that you tend to shy away from?
    I tend to steer away from blogs that are outside my personal interests, are heavily focuses on religious or political topics, or have inconsistent posting schedules.
  12. Is there a better graphic format or specific specs that lend to a graphic being more suitable to be on a blog that an Author or PA can easily do or should spend the time doing?
    I tend to favor PNG format, because it allows for transparent backgrounds, and I try to keep the images simple. PNG allows for transparent backgrounds, and is great for logos, or anything that might potentially be placed over a number of different backgrounds. The simpler the images are, the better they work when scaled up or down, which really helps bloggers get the best placement of images within the text.
  13. What has blogging given you that nothing else could have?
    I’m not really sure I can nail this one down, because for me it’s writing practice, an extension of my marketing, and another way of reaching readers, and I’m already doing that elsewhere too.
  14. How does someone schedule with you to be on your blog?
    I have two slots which I allow authors to apply for directly, my book spotlight and author spotlight slots. These are my most popular guest slots, and I try to work with the authors as much as possible so that we can schedule the posts to coincide with any events that might be happening. Authors visit the relevant link (below), and fill out the forms as much as possible. Images can be uploaded through the forms, and the higher the resolution, the better. The process of submitting the form notifies me that the author has completed the application, and auto-formats a new blog post. From there, I check over the post, make sure it’s a fit for my followers, and then contact the author to get any clarifications I might need. If the author is requesting a book spotlight, and I approve the application, I create a book spotlight poster for the author’s approval. Finally I finalize the release schedule and send the author the links that the post will appear on.
  15. Why do you think Blogging is still effective for Book Promotions?
    Readers love to discover new books in their chosen genres, and bloggers have a unique opportunity to reach out to those readers. I know that as a reader I’m following blogs of well over a dozen writers or book groups, and receiving regular updates keeps me up to date on new releases and events. With the advent of social media, things became even more connected than ever. The chance to connect blogs to social media accounts gives bloggers a huge opportunity to connect with not just their followers, but for their followers to share posts in ways that were never possible before.